Making Art Therapy

Neurology Now
November/December 2006
Volume 2(6)
p 46–47
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Art therapy has emerged as a mainstream healthcare profession that uses painting and drawing to improve the physical, mental, and emotional wellbeing of patients. Art has been shown to help with everything from memory enhancement to movement rehabilitation, treating such neurological conditions as Alzheimer's, stroke, and Parkinson's. For more information on the art therapy concepts covered in our special report on page 24, contact the following:

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For more information on the art therapy concepts covered in our special report on page 24, contact the following:

American Art Therapy Association

arttherapy.org

The AATA, representing 4,500 professionals and students, has established standards for art therapy education, ethics, and practice. Its website features an art therapist locator.

Museum of Modern Art (New York City)

accessprogram@moma.org

212-408-6347

Offers a monthly art appreciation program for people with dementia.

Museum of Fine Arts (Boston)

access@mfa.org

617-369-3302

Offers guided tours for people with Alzheimer's.

The Art Therapy Sourcebook

By Cathy A. Malchiodi (McGraw-Hill, 2006)

This easy-to-read book explains how art therapy can be used as a powerful tool for healing both emotional and physical symptoms. The author, who edited the AATA's journal, notes that art can help people “solve problems, release powerful or distressing emotions, recover from traumatic losses or experiences, or alleviate pain or other physical symptoms.”

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HELP FOR ALL NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

ninds.nih.gov

“The Brain Matters” AAN Foundation patient website

thebrainmatters.org

American Academy of Neurology Foundation

neurofoundation.org

ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

Alzheimer's Association

alz.org

1-800-272-3900

Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center

alzheimers.org

1-800-438-4380

Alzheimer's Foundation of America

alzfdn.org

1-866-232-8484

AUTISM

Autism Society of America

autism-society.org

1-800-3AUTISM (1-800-328-8476)

EPILEPSY

Epilepsy Foundation

epilepsyfoundation.org

1-800-332-1000

Sturge-Weber Foundation

sturge-weber.com

1-800-627-5482

HEADACHE

National Headache Foundation

headaches.org

1-888-NHF-5552 (1-888-643-5552)

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

National Multiple Sclerosis Society

nationalmssociety.org

1-800-FIGHT-MS (1-800-344-4867)

Multiple Sclerosis Association of America

msaa.com

1-800-532-7667

NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES

ALS Association

alsa.org

1-800-782-4747

Muscular Dystrophy Association

mda.org

1-800-FIGHT-MD (1-800-344-4863)

PAIN

American Pain Foundation

painfoundation.org

1-888-615-PAIN (1-888-615-7246)

Neuropathy Association

neuropathy.org

212-692-0662

PARKINSON'S DISEASE

National Parkinson Foundation

parkinson.org

1-800-327-4545

Parkinson's Disease Foundation

pdf.org

1-800-457-6676

Michael J. Fox Foundation

for Parkinson's Research

michaeljfox.org

1-800-708-7644

SLEEP DISORDERS

National Sleep Foundation

sleepfoundation.org

STROKE

American Stroke Association

strokeassociation.org

1-888-4-STROKE (1-800-478-7653)

National Stroke Association

stroke.org

1-800-STROKES (1-800-787-6563)

TRAUMA

Brain Injury Association of America

biausa.org

1-800-444-6443

National Spinal Cord Injury Association

spinalcord.org

1-800-962-9629

FINDING THE WORDS

The Aphasia Handbook

(National Aphasia Association, 2004)

This unique guide helps stroke and brain injury survivors communicate when the frustrating condition known as aphasia impairs their ability to talk, listen, read, and write. Advice is presented through illustrations and captions as well as easy-to-read text. Designed specifically for people with aphasia (as well as families and friends), the handbook suggests different strategies to help them communicate. Contact the National Aphasia Association (at 1-800-922-4622 and naa@aphasia.org) or visit its website at aphasia.org

Rx for Medicare Part D

This is for the 2 million newcomers to Medicare, the 5 million eligible beneficiaries who didn't enroll in 2006, and even the 38 million who did. Since most prescription drug plans will change their costs and benefi ts for 2007, it's important to compare yours with others in your area to be sure you choose the one that best meets your needs—even if you're happy with your current coverage. For more information on the Medicare Part D program (as discussed in our story on page 44) and for help as the Dec. 31 enrollment deadline approaches, visit the following websites:

GOVERNMENT OFFICES

Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services

medicare.gov

1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227)

The government site's “Medicare Prescription Drug Finder” offers help navigating the maze of providers. For those without web access, call the helpline.

Social Security Administration

ssa.gov/prescriptionhelp

1-800-772-1213

State Health Insurance

Assistance Program

shiptalk.org , 1-800-677-1116

ADVOCACY ORGANIZATIONS

Medicare Rights Center

medicarerights.org

1-888-466-9050

212-869-3850

Families USA

familiesusa.org

202-628-3030

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