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Neurology Now Magazine

An official bi-monthly publication of the American Academy of Neurology, and published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Neurology Now® features new information about advances in the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic diseases.

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Read the June 2017/July 2017 issue

Breaking News from the American Academy of Neurology

What Percentage of ALS Is Genetic?

Up to 90 percent of people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) report that they have no family history of the disease. Now, new research has found approximately 17 percent of such ALS cases may be caused by a gene mutation, according to a study published in the June 21, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (June 21, 2017)

For Headache, Telemedicine May Be as Effective as In-Person Visit

(June 14, 2017)

Does Consuming Low-Fat Dairy Increase the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease?

Consuming at least three servings of low-fat dairy a day is associated with a greater risk of developing Parkinson’s disease compared to consuming less than one serving a day, according to a large study published in the June 7, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. In addition, drinking more than one serving of low-fat or skim milk per day is associated with a greater risk of developing Parkinson’s disease compared to drinking less than one serving per week. The study results do not show that dairy products cause Parkinson’s disease—they just show an association. (June 7, 2017)

In MS, Problems Reading Social Cues May Be Tied to Brain Changes

For people with multiple sclerosis (MS), an impaired ability to understand how others feel and think may be linked to subtle brain changes, according to a study published in the May 31, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (June 1, 2017)

Hospitals Vary Widely in Transitioning from Treatment to Comfort Care After Stroke

– Hospitals vary widely in how often they transition people with strokes from active treatment to comfort or hospice care within 48 hours after they get to the hospital, according to a new study published in the May 24, 2017, online issue of Neurology® Clinical Practice, an official journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (June 1, 2017)

Blacks, Hispanics Less Likely to See Neurologist as Outpatient

Black and Hispanic people are less likely to see a neurologist in the office or as an outpatient than white people in the United States, according to a study published in the May 17, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Black people with neurologic conditions such as Parkinson’s disease and stroke were more likely to be cared for in the hospital emergency department and had more hospital stays than whites. (June 1, 2017)

Higher Levels of Biomarker Linked to Increased Stroke Risk for Women

Women with elevated levels of a protein in their blood may be at a higher risk of ischemic stroke, according to a study published in the May 10, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The new research comes in time for Stroke Awareness Month in May. (May 11, 2017)

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