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NINDS Disorders is an index of neurological conditions provided by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. This valuable tool offers detailed descriptions, facts on treatment and prognosis, and patient organization contact information for over 500 identified neurological disorders.

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Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a severe form of epilepsy. Seizures usually begin before 4 years of age. Seizure types, which vary among patients, include tonic (stiffening of the body, upward deviation of the eyes, dilation of the pupils, and altered respiratory patterns), atonic (brief loss of muscle tone and consciousness, causing abrupt falls), atypical absence (staring spells), and myoclonic (sudden muscle jerks). There may be periods of frequent seizures mixed with brief, relatively seizure-free periods. Most children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome experience some degree of impaired intellectual functioning or information processing, along with developmental delays, and behavioral disturbances. Lennox-Gastaut syndrome can be caused by brain malformations, perinatal asphyxia, severe head injury, central nervous system infection and inherited degenerative or metabolic conditions. In 30-35 percent of cases, no cause can be found.

Treatment

Treatment for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome includes clobazam and anti-epileptic medications such as valproate, lamotrigine, felbamate, or topiramate. There is usually no single antiepileptic medication that will control seizures. Children who improve initially may later show tolerance to a drug or have uncontrollable seizures.

Prognosis

The prognosis for individuals with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome varies. There is no cure for the disorder. Complete recovery, including freedom from seizures and normal development, is very unusual.

Research

The NINDS conducts and supports a broad program of basic and clinical research on epilepsy including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. These studies are aimed at finding the causes of these disorders, improving the diagnosis, and developing new medications and other therapies.

View a list of studies currently seeking patients.

View more studies on this condition.

Organizations

Intractable Childhood Epilepsy Alliance

The Intractable Childhood Epilepsy Alliance is a non-profit 501c3 organization dedicated to improving lives of children affected by intractable epilepsy through evidence-based information, advocacy for appropriate medical treatment including compassionate use and Orphan drug products, promotion of drug development, data collection through patient registries, and funding of research that will lead to a cure for intractable childhood epilepsies.

PO Box 365
6360 Shallowford Road
Lewisville, NC 27023
Tel: 336-946-1570
Fax: 336-946-1571

Epilepsy Foundation

National charitable organization dedicated to the welfare of people with epilepsy. Works to ensure that people with seizures are able to participate in all life experiences; to improve how people with epilepsy are perceived, accepted and valued in society; and to promote research for a cure. Offers a Legal Defense Program through a fund.

8301 Professional Place
Landover, MD 20785-7223
Tel: 301-459-3700 800-EFA-1000 (332-1000)
Fax: 301-577-2684

LGS Foundation

LGS Foundation is a not-for- profit organization dedicated to providing information about Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, a rare and severe form of childhood onset epilepsy, while raising funds for research, programs, and services for individuals living with LGS, and their families.

192 Lexington Avenue
Ste 216
New York, NY 10016
Tel: 212-802-1401

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