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NINDS Disorders is an index of neurological conditions provided by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. This valuable tool offers detailed descriptions, facts on treatment and prognosis, and patient organization contact information for over 500 identified neurological disorders.

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Friedreich's Ataxia

Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited disease that causes progressive damage to the nervous system resulting in symptoms ranging from muscle weakness and speech problems to heart disease. Ataxia results from the degeneration of nerve tissue in the spinal cord and of nerves that control muscle movement in the arms and legs. Symptoms usually begin between the ages of 5 and 15 but can appear as early as 18 months or as late as 30 years of age. The first symptom is usually difficulty in walking. The ataxia gradually worsens and slowly spreads to the arms and then the trunk. Foot deformities such as clubfoot, flexion (involuntary bending) of the toes, hammer toes, or foot inversion (turning in) may be early signs. Rapid, rhythmic, involuntary movements of the eyeball are common. Most people with Friedreich's ataxia develop scoliosis (a curving of the spine to one side), which, if severe, may impair breathing. Other symptoms include chest pain, shortness of breath, and heart palpitations. Some individuals may develop diabetes.  Doctors diagnose Friedreich's ataxia by performing a careful clinical examination, which includes a medical history and a thorough physical examination. Several tests may be performed, including electromyogram (EMG) and genetic testing.

Treatment

There is currently no effective cure or treatment for Friedreich's ataxia. However, many of the symptoms and accompanying complications can be treated to help patients maintain optimal functioning as long as possible. Diabetes and heart problems can be treated with medications. Orthopedic problems such as foot deformities and scoliosis can be treated with braces or surgery. Physical therapy may prolong use of the arms and legs.

Prognosis

Generally, within 15 to 20 years after the appearance of the first symptoms, the person is confined to a wheelchair, and in later stages of the disease, individuals become completely incapacitated. Most people with Friedreich's ataxia die in early adulthood if there is significant heart disease, the most common cause of death. Some people with less severe symptoms live much longer.

Research

Studies have revealed that frataxin, a protein that should normally be present in the nervous system, the heart, and the pancreas, is severely reduced in patients with Friedreich's ataxia. Studies have shown that patients have abnormally high levels of iron in their heart tissue. It is believed that the nervous system, heart, and pancreas may be particularly susceptible to damage from free radicals (produced when the excess iron reacts with oxygen) because once certain cells in these tissues are destroyed by free radicals they cannot be replaced. Nerve and muscle cells also have metabolic needs that may make them particularly vulnerable to free radical damage. The discovery of the genetic mutation that causes Friedreich's ataxia has added new impetus to research efforts on this disease.

View a list of studies currently seeking patients.

View more studies on this condition.

Read additional information from Medline Plus.

Organizations

Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance (FARA)

National non-profit organization dedicated to the pursuit of educational, scientific and research activities leading to treatments for Friedreich's ataxia.

P.O. Box 1537
Springfield, VA 22151
Tel: (703) 426-1576
Fax: (703) 425-0643

Genetic Alliance

International coalition representing 600 consumer and professional organizations. Supports individuals and families with genetic conditions; educates the public; and advocates for consumer-informed public policies.

4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W.
Suite 404
Washington, DC 20008-2369
Tel: 202-966-5557 800 336-GENE (4363)
Fax: 202-966-8553

Muscular Dystrophy Association

Voluntary health agency that fosters neuromuscular disease research and provides patient care funded almost entirely by individual private contributors. MDA addresses the muscular dystrophies, spinal muscular atrophy, ALS, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, myasthenia gravis, Friedreich's ataxia, metabolic diseases of muscle, and inflammatory diseases of muscle, for a total of more than 40 neuromuscular diseases.

3300 East Sunrise Drive
Tucson, AZ 85718-3208
Tel: 520-529-2000 800-572-1717
Fax: 520-529-5300

National Ataxia Foundation (NAF)

Encourages and supports research into the hereditary ataxias, a group of chronic and progressive neurological disorders affecting coordination. Sponsors chapters and support groups throughout the U.S.A. and Canada. Publishes a quarterly newsletter and educational literature on the various forms of ataxia.

2600 Fernbrook Lane North
Suite 119
Minneapolis, MN 55447-4752
Tel: 763-553-0020
Fax: 763-553-0167

National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)

Federation of voluntary health organizations dedicated to helping people with rare "orphan" diseases and assisting the organizations that serve them. Committed to the identification, treatment, and cure of rare disorders through programs of education, advocacy, research, and service.

55 Kenosia Avenue
Danbury, CT 06810
Tel: 203-744-0100 Voice Mail 800-999-NORD (6673)
Fax: 203-798-2291

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