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NINDS Disorders is an index of neurological conditions provided by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. This valuable tool offers detailed descriptions, facts on treatment and prognosis, and patient organization contact information for over 500 identified neurological disorders.

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Chorea

Chorea is an abnormal involuntary movement disorder, one of a group of neurological disorders called dyskinesias, which are caused by overactivity of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the areas of the brain that control movement. Chorea is characterized by brief, irregular contractions that are not repetitive or rhythmic, but appear to flow from one muscle to the next. Chorea often occurs with athetosis, which adds twisting and writhing movements. Chorea is a primary feature of Huntington's disease, a progressive, hereditary movement disorder that appears in adults, but it may also occur in a variety of other conditions. Syndenham's chorea occurs in a small percentage (20 percent) of children and adolescents as a complication of rheumatic fever. Chorea can also be induced by drugs (levodopa, anti-convulsants, and anti-psychotics) metabolic and endocrine disorders, and vascular incidents.

Treatment

There is no standard course of treatment for chorea. Treatment depends on the type of chorea and the associated disease. Treatment for Huntington's disease is supportive, while treatment for Syndenham's chorea usually involves antibiotic drugs to treat the infection, followed by drug therapy to prevent recurrence. Adjusting medication dosages can treat drug-induced chorea. Metabolic and endocrine-related choreas are treated according to the cause(s) of symptoms.

Prognosis

The prognosis for individuals with chorea varies depending on the type of chorea and the associated disease. Huntington's disease is a progressive, and ultimately, fatal disease. Syndenham's chorea is treatable and curable.

Research

The NINDS supports research on movement disorders such as chorea. The goals of this research are to increase understanding of these disorders and to find ways to prevent and treat them.

View a list of studies currently seeking patients.

View more studies on this condition.

Organizations

Hereditary Disease Foundation

Non-profit basic science organization dedicated to the cure of genetic disease. All publicly donated funds are directed toward the support of biomedical research.

3960 Broadway
6th Floor
New York, NY 10032
Tel: 212-928-2121
Fax: 212-928-2172

Huntington's Disease Society of America

Dedicated to finding a cure for Huntington’s Disease while providing support and services for those with HD and their families.

505 Eighth Avenue
Suite 902
New York, NY 10018
Tel: 212-242-1968 800-345-HDSA (4372)
Fax: 212-239-3430

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