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NINDS Disorders is an index of neurological conditions provided by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. This valuable tool offers detailed descriptions, facts on treatment and prognosis, and patient organization contact information for over 500 identified neurological disorders.

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Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is one of the most common inherited neurological disorders, affecting approximately 1 in 2,500 people in the United States.  CMT,  also known as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) or peroneal muscular atrophy, comprises a group of disorders caused by mutations in genes that affect the normal function of the peripheral nerves.  The peripheral nerves lie outside the brain and spinal cord and supply the muscles and sensory organs in the limbs.  A typical feature includes weakness of the foot and lower leg muscles, which may result in foot drop and a high-stepped gait with frequent tripping or falling. Foot deformities, such as high arches and hammertoes (a condition in which the middle joint of a toe bends upwards), are also characteristic due to weakness of the small muscles in the feet. In addition, the lower legs may take on an "inverted champagne bottle" appearance due to the loss of muscle bulk. Later in the disease, weakness and muscle atrophy may occur in the hands, resulting in difficulty with fine motor skills. Some individuals experience pain, which can range from mild to severe.

Treatment

There is no cure for CMT, but physical therapy, occupational therapy, braces and other orthopedic devices, and orthopedic surgery can help people cope with the disabling symptoms of the disease. In addition, pain-killing drugs can be prescribed for patients who have severe pain.

Prognosis

Onset of symptoms of CMT is most often in adolescence or early adulthood, however presentation may be delayed until mid-adulthood.  Progression of symptoms is very gradual.  The degeneration of motor nerves results in muscle weakness and atrophy in the extremities (arms, legs, hands, or feet), and the degeneration of sensory nerves results in a reduced ability to feel heat, cold, and pain.  There are many forms of CMT disease.  The severity of symptoms may vary greatly among individuals and some people may never realize they have the disorder. CMT is not fatal and people with most forms of CMT have a normal life expectancy.

Research

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) conducts CMT research in its laboratories at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and also supports CMT research through grants to major medical institutions across the country.   Ongoing research includes efforts to identify more of the mutant genes and proteins that cause the various disease subtypes.  This research includes studies in the laboratory to discover the mechanisms of nerve degeneration and muscle atrophy, and clinical studies to find therapies to slow down or even reverse nerve degeneration and muscle atrophy.  

View a list of studies currently seeking patients.

View more studies on this condition.

Read additional information from Medline Plus.

Organizations

Charcot-Marie-Tooth Association (CMTA)

Provides education and support to persons with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disorders, their families, and the health professionals who treat them.

2700 Chestnut Parkway
Chester, PA 19013-4867
Tel: 610-499-9264 800-606-CMTA (2682)
Fax: 610-499-9267

Muscular Dystrophy Association

Voluntary health agency that fosters neuromuscular disease research and provides patient care funded almost entirely by individual private contributors. MDA addresses the muscular dystrophies, spinal muscular atrophy, ALS, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, myasthenia gravis, Friedreich's ataxia, metabolic diseases of muscle, and inflammatory diseases of muscle, for a total of more than 40 neuromuscular diseases.

3300 East Sunrise Drive
Tucson, AZ 85718-3208
Tel: 520-529-2000 800-572-1717
Fax: 520-529-5300

Neuropathy Association

The Neuropathy Association is the leading national nonprofit organization providing peripheral neuropathy patient support and education, advocating for patients' interests, and promoting critical research. We have 50,000 members and supporters, and a nationwide network of 135 support groups and 12 Neuropathy Centers of Excellence at prominent medical institutions.

60 East 42nd Street
Suite 942
New York, NY 10165-0999
Tel: 888-PN-FACTS (888-763-2287)
Fax: 212-692-0668

Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation, Inc

Dedicated to raising awareness, funding innovative research and improving quality of life for those with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disorder, their families, and caregivers by offering medical information to help manage the CMT as well as emotional support.

432 Park Avenue South
4th Floor
New York, NY 10128
Tel: 855-HELPCMT (435-7268) 212-722-8396

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